History & Stewardship | Premier Ranch
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History & Stewardship

Premier Ranch Est. 1872

Originally the Kothmann Family ranch settled in the 1870’s.  Family began work on the two-story brown stone house in 1875.

 

Elgin Otto Kothmann, the youngest of 8 children, was the driving force behind the Premier Ranch top-end Hereford cattle operation.  His name still remains on the large concrete entrance off Highway 87 between Mason and Fredericksburg, Texas.

 

Today, the historic ranch is headquarters for Haverlah Ranches Registered Angus Cattle operation and the Premier Ranch Hunting establishment.  You can hunt year round with a variety of exotics or come during quail, turkey or whitetail deer season for a great hunting experience.

 

Ranch house 1920's

4A6 Premier Ranch019

Front entrance

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Ranch House Today

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  Stewardship  “Then the LORD God took the man and put him into the garden of Eden to cultivate it and keep it…”  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~  As both a hunting and cattle operation, we believe that the management of wildlife and livestock should mesh in a symbiotic relationship. To promote this kind of interconnectivity, the cultivation of soil and plant health, in addition to management of water resources, finds a place of eminent importance. By preserving and encouraging sources of food and water, we allow the wildlife population to thrive and proliferate.  In his 1933 textbook, Game Management, Aldo Leopold wrote:

“The central thesis of game management is this: game can be restored by the creative use of the same tools which have heretofore destroyed it: axe, plow, cow, fire, and gun. Management is their purposeful and continuing alignment.”

 Our implementation of Leopold’s management tools include the following: control burns, rotational deferred grazing, moderate stocking rates, chemical and mechanical deterrents for invasive plant species, adherence to TPWD recommendations for harvest and population density of whitetail deer, etc.  Using these tools, we can gradually improve overall range health, which benefits the land, water, wildlife, and livestock. This is a methodical process that yields few immediate results that are discernable by the naked eye. However, our commitment to conservation is characterized by consistency and humility. We will adhere to foundational, and stable, principles of wildlife management and incorporate new tactics to engage fresh challenges or to rectify mistakes.  Sincerely,  Steve C. Haverlah  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~  Steve has repeatedly been recognized for his work in land management and conservation. In 1996, he was presented with the inaugural Lone Star Land Steward Award for the ecoregion of Edwards Plateau. Steve has been a member of the Llano County Soil & Water Conservation Board since 2003 and currently serves as the board’s chairman.